Some strong women do not believe Christine Blasey Ford

Though the majority of American women appear to believe Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s sexual assault accusation against Brett Kavanaugh, the news media are surprised that a considerable number of women find her presentation both unbelievable and embarrassing.

Octogenarian Doris O’Brien, writing in the American Thinker says Ford has “belittled” all women by appearing meek and fragile at the Senate Judiciary hearing last week. She says that if such an encounter (assault by Kavanaugh) actually occurred, by Ford’s own admission, there was no penetration, no physical harm or disability, only psychologically trauma. It should not have subsequently dominated her life.

O’Brien says that by speaking with no one about the alleged incident — close friends, family member(s) or trusted adults — she would have potentially become complicit in any future violent acts against other women by Kavanaugh. Ford says she even left her good friend, Leland Keyser, at the party completely unaware that she was now alone with four guys, two of whom had just tried to rape Ford. Some friend.

Read moreSome strong women do not believe Christine Blasey Ford

Sex crimes prosecutor Mitchell says evidence is nonexistent

Career sex-crimes prosecutor, Rachel Mitchell, has issued her final report (memorandum) on her conclusions from the Senate Judiciary hearing last Thursday.

Here is what she has specifically detailed to justify her position that Dr. Ford’s allegation does not rise to the level where “a reasonable prosecutor would bring a case.”

1. “Dr. Ford has not offered a consistent account of when the alleged assault happened.”

Ford originally said that the alleged incident occurred in the “mid-1980s,” but this recollection was later amended to the “early 80s.” More recently it was narrowed down to the “summer of 1982” in the September 16 Washington Post article.

The Post article also stated that notes from a 2013 individual therapy session had her saying she was in her “late teens” at the time of the alleged assault.

Read moreSex crimes prosecutor Mitchell says evidence is nonexistent

The questions that should have been asked of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford

For many Americans who watched the extraordinary Senate Judiciary hearing that was held on Thursday, the questions asked by Arizona prosecutor Rachel Mitchell of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford were perhaps not what one might have considered penetrating enough to determine the truth about her allegations of sexual misconduct by Brett Kavanaugh when he was seventeen.

I acknowledge that hard-edged questions directed toward a woman who may have been psychologically traumatized by an alleged event 36 years ago would be perceived to be both politically and ethically insensitive. But the overall destructive magnitude of the charge is so great that I believe Ms. Mitchell’s questions should have been more probing of the alleged event itself.

The American people have a right to know as much as possible about that evening and at this point, only Dr. Christine Blasey Ford can give us any information at all about what took place in or around the Bethesda, Maryland area one evening in, what she believes, was the summer of 1982.

These fictional questions (in color and italicized) are interspersed with Dr. Ford’s actual testimony or between actual questions from the hearing participants.

So let us begin.

Read moreThe questions that should have been asked of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford

x Logo: Shield
This Site Is Protected By
Shield