Socialism’s Rebirth in America

(First in a seven-part series: Medicare for All – Quality and Accessible Care for None)

Socialism’s origins in America began 400 years ago, when the Pilgrims made a commitment to leave the Netherlands for the New World after forming a partnership with a group of merchants from London.

Britain granted this new jointly-owned company a plantation in the Virginia Colony in 1617.  Of course, we know they missed their intended destination by hundreds of miles when they landed instead along the Massachusetts coast.

This contract was a socialist planner’s dream. It stated that each adult would acquire an equal share in the company; it meant that when they arrived in 1620 Plymouth Colony operated under the governing mandate that all production was owned by the collective. “Food for All” might have been the catchy, feel-good phrase used at the time.

This economic experiment produced disastrous, fatal results.  During the very first winter alone, half of the new colonists perished.

Finally, in 1623, America’s first experiment with socialism was mercifully scrapped. Individual, private property rights were established for both land and production giving each settler the right to keep (eat or sell) the fruits of his labors.

Today, just when we thought it was dead (yet again), socialism is experiencing a strong political rebirth in the United States. Combine this sentiment with an increasing distrust/dislike for private insurance companies along with a collective misunderstanding of what defines a “human right” and it’s no surprise “single-payer” or “universal health care” or the attractively-named “Medicare for All” is a steamroller-like political movement.

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